A Snowflake Test Could Cause You More Trouble Than It's Worth

It’s possible that organizations today rely more on human capital than ever before. Good talent acquisition and retention strategy are therefore crucial for success. The truth is, most business owners don’t do it right, especially when they’re just starting out.

The problem is that, in the absence of properly validated tools, people are prone to glancing at things that may be detrimental to the hiring process.

Kyle Reyes, CEO of The Silent Partner Marketing, made headlines last week when he unveiled his new screening tool called the “Snowflake Test.” He claims that the test eliminates whiny, complaining job applicants.

What’s a snowflake? A snowflake, according to Reyes, is someone who complains and whines about it and has no expertise to back up his or her opinions.

Several weeks ago, Reyes posted the entire “Snowflake Test” on his Facebook page and claimed that sixty percent of interviewees were eliminated as a result.

There have been more than 15,000 emails and messages of support sent to Reyes since the announcement.

He clearly touched a nerve. Your business may be tempted to use the “Snowflake Test,” but it may cause more problems than it solves.

You May Face Legal Repercussions

If you violate the law, you may face legal consequences

One of these asks “What does faith mean to you?” Although it is not asking about a person’s religious beliefs, it could be interpreted as such.

The following questions about America could be problematic:

This line of questioning may seem harmless at first glance, but it will likely prove

  • “What does the United States mean to you?”
  • “You see someone stepping on the American flag. What are you going to do?”
  • Is the first amendment important to you? What does it mean to you?”

ide the interviewer with information about the applicant’s country of origin. The EEOC (Equal Employment Opportunity Commission) does not like that question.

The selection process has a legal underbelly. I cannot emphasize enough how important it is for any criterion predictor to be job-related. It is not possible to imagine these things. You run the risk of getting caught up in the legal weeds if you ask candidates questions that are not valid and not reliable indicators of job performance.

There is a chance that you think your business is exempt from EEOC laws. Nevertheless, if your business has 15 employees or more, you should rethink how you think.

Think about the fact that many small businesses stay out of legal disputes with employees because of ignorance on the part of the employees. Hope is not a sound business strategy when it comes to hiring an employee who understands employment law.

You May Suffer if Your Workforce Is Too Diverse

The topic of workforce diversity is hot right now if you read business publications. Why? Diversity of thought is associated with innovation – and innovation is associated with success, according to growing research.

As one reads and listens to Mr. Reyes, one gets the feeling that his test has been designed to identify like-minded individuals. This might explain part of its appeal outside of his organization. Many of the commenters on Facebook seem to share their views.

However, it is unlikely that one can hire well through gimmicks, gut instincts, culture, or whatever is the latest buzz at the time. If you prioritize culture over knowledge, skill, and ability, you’ll just end up with an echo chamber.

A good fit between a person and a job is the key to successful hiring. It means, above all else, that an individual has the KSAOs, the Knowledge, Skills, Abilities, and Other qualities a job candidate must possess in order to successfully perform at the level the job requires.

No matter what a candidate thinks about police, guns, or safe spaces, it doesn’t matter unless, perhaps, one is looking for security personnel.