Building a high-quality Voice Over Internet Protocol headset, or VOIP headset, is not rocket science, but it does require a bit of know-how with regard to how modern technology works. That includes what to expect, how it is an improvement over modern phone lines, and why it won’t work if connected wrong. Unlike the old traditional landline approach, VOIP phones require a bit more than just a phone jack in the room wall. 

Putting Together a VoIP Phone Headset

VOIP headsets generally work as audio headsets that connect and interpret audio signals and related data packages sent over an Internet network. On the outside, the headset looks straightforward enough – two-ear headphones and a microphone to speak in. Generally, the units connect to a computer connected to the Internet either through a USB connection socket and wire or via Bluetooth. The advantage of the Bluetooth connection is that it essentially works wireless, allowing the user to connect while moving around a room or facility without being constrained by a connection wire. No surprise, people prefer the Bluetooth version of a VOIP headset more often than not.

Selection Criteria

Ideally, the criteria for a good VOIP headset should meet some personal factors. Those vary per person but each of the categories should be addressed including:

  • Flexibility – the headset should work with the person’s work environment and not become more of an obstacle to free movement. Wireless models meet this criterion better.
  • Connectivity – Bluetooth or USB, the headset needs to connect to the network reliably. In offices, routers and repeaters make that easy, but in a home office, distance from the home wi-fi router can begin to be noticed with cheaper units. 
  • Call Quality – What’s the point of a headset if listening to a call sounds like grating sandpaper? The sound quality on a good VOIP headset needs to be consistently clear on every call. There shouldn’t be crackling static, erratic connections, or vulnerability to interference from nearby signals or equipment. The best headsets have noise-canceling to silence background noise.

Evaluation Mistakes

One of the most common ways to evaluate headsets is to assume cost is a defining factor of quality. So, folks go for the budget they can afford and try to get as best as they can. This approach helps, but it’s not perfect and can result in mistakes. Focus on both quality and cost, not just pricing alone.

Wearability should be comfortable. Don’t focus on a headset that looks great or performs fine with sound without actually wearing it. After a few hours of wearing, it could be a painful experience with a bad fit.

Don’t leave out the warranty. Many seemingly good models will seem like a good deal, but they don’t include warranty protection. 

Ultimately, putting together a VoIP phone headset is an approach that meets the personal needs of both the user as well as the environment it will be used in. This is why there is no default combination that takes care of everyone the same. Focus on the criteria above, and your choice of VoIP headset assembly will serve you well.